This post may contain affiliate links which won’t change your price but will share some commission.

|

Green Tomato Pickles – Easy Pickled Green Tomato Recipe for Canning

Sharing is caring!

I made up a batch of these pickled green tomatoes to use up some of the unripe tomatoes knocked off the vines during our recent hail storm. We picked all the storm damaged fruit, and trimmed off the spoiled bits, saving the undamaged parts for preserving.

green tomato pickles

I found a number of green tomato recipes, but pickled green tomatoes seemed most likely to appeal to my family. (The crew groaned out loud at the green tomato mincemeat recipe.) We like dill pickles, so why not dilly green tomato pickles?

Want a super easy dill pickle recipe that doesn't require canning? Check out Betty's Dill Pickles.

Pickled Green Tomatoes – Which Tomatoes to Use

These pickled green tomatoes work best with small, firm tomatoes, not ones that are large and juicy. The firmer the fruit going into the pickle, the firmer the end product. The recipe isn't meant for tomatoes that are green when ripe. I'm sure you could still turn those into green tomato pickles, too, but they would be soft and mushy. This recipe also works fine for pickled green cherry tomatoes.

I use cider vinegar in my pickled green tomatoes, but you could also use white vinegar for a brighter color. Homemade vinegar is not recommended because the acidity may vary.

green tomato pickle ingredients

Green Tomato Pickles Recipe

Adapted from the Ball Blue Book of Preserving Dilled Green Tomatoes recipe.

Ingredients

  • 5 pounds small, firm green tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup canning salt
  • 3 1/2 cups vinegar
  • 3 1/2 cups water
  • garlic cloves, 6 or 7
  • fresh dill heads, 6-7;  or 1/4 cup dill seeds
  • bay leaves, 6 or 7

Directions

Prepare jars and two piece canning lids. Wash tomatoes, drain. Core tomatoes; cut into halves or quarters.

pick;ed green tomatoes ingredients

Combine salt, vinegar and water in a large sauce pot. Bring to a boil.

Pack tomato chunks into hot jars, leaving 1/4 inch headspace. Add 1 clove garlic, 1 head of dill (or 2 teaspoons dill seeds) and 1 bay leaf to each jar.

pickled green tomatoes

Ladle hot liquid over tomatoes, leaving 1/4 inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims and screw on lids finger tights.

Process 15 minutes in a boiling water bath canner. Yields about 6 pints.

Recommended Resources:

More Condiment and Relish Water Bath Canning Recipes

Because of added vinegar, most pickle and condiment recipes (like pickled green tomatoes) can be processed in a water bath canner instead of a pressure canner. These are some of the other water bath canning recipes featured on the site:

For an overview of different ways to store food at home, see Home Food Preservation – 10 Ways to Preserve Food at Home.

Are you a fan of pickled green tomatoes or green tomatoes in general? What's your favorite way to use them? Do you have any other tips for using garden produce that might otherwise not make the cut? Leave a comment and let me know.

Print Friendly Recipe

Print

Green Tomato Pickles – Easy Pickled Green Tomato Recipe for Canning

Pickled green tomatoes are a great way to use up unripe tomatoes, or simply mix up your tomato harvest with the crisp texture of green tomatoes.

  • Prep Time: 20 minutes
  • Cook Time: 15 minutes
  • Total Time: 35 minutes
  • Yield: 67 pints 1x
  • Category: Condiment
  • Method: Canning
  • Cuisine: American

Ingredients

Scale
  • 5 pounds small, firm green tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup canning salt
  • 3 1/2 cups vinegar
  • 3 1/2 cups water
  • garlic cloves, 6 or 7
  • fresh dill heads, 6-7;  or 1/4 cup dill seeds
  • bay leaves, 6 or 7

Instructions

Prepare jars and two piece canning lids. Wash tomatoes, drain. Core tomatoes; cut into halves or quarters.

Combine salt, vinegar and water in a large sauce pot. Bring to a boil.

Pack tomato chunks into hot jars, leaving 1/4 inch headspace. Add 1 clove garlic, 1 head of dill (or 2 teaspoons dill seeds) and 1 bay leaf to each jar.

Ladle hot liquid over tomatoes, leaving 1/4 inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims and screw on lids finger tights.

Process 15 minutes in a boiling water bath canner. Yields about 6 pints.

Notes

Note: Nutrition information includes salt in the brine, most of which is not eaten unless you like to drink pickle juice.

Keywords: pickle, pickled green tomatoes

Did you make this recipe?

Share a photo and tag us — we can't wait to see what you've made!

green tomato pickles

Originally published in 2017, updated in 2018.

Similar Posts

27 Comments

  1. Hi there,
    Thanks for your informative emails.
    I live in Nova Scotia and was listening just this week to a lady being interviewed on radio. She had written a well-known book on canning and she mentioned, in the interview, that there weren’t any green tomato recipes in the book because green tomatoes have a high solanine content. Your thoughts?

    1. The solanine content in green tomatoes is higher than in red tomatoes, but the plant (leaves and stems) have the highest concentration of solanine. Some sensitive individuals may still get an upset stomach from consuming large amounts. As mentioned in the post, green tomatoes should be processed before eating, not eaten raw.

  2. I have been making these for over 15 years & I have always refrigerated mine after the jars are room temperature. Refrigerating them makes them really crisp; my son can eat an entire quart jar of these in front of a football game! We only wait a couple of days and start eating them.

    1. Ball now says their seals are officially good for 18 months. I try to use canned goods up within 2 years. Much beyond that, and the quality starts to decline. (Color fades, they get softer, etc.)

  3. Hi Laurie, I love ‘tomolives’ and am wondering if using cherry tomatoes in this recipe would be similar. I plan on trying it this year but wondered if you’ve had any previous experience using green cherry tomatoes whole in this recipe? Thanks!

  4. I’m Curious, I’m a huge fan of superdawg pickled tomatoes. Their green and crunchy and have an amazing taste. IS this recipe a good example of this type of picked tomato?

  5. Question, it says to core the tomatoes, which means to remove the insides, however the picture shows the insides still in the tomatoes. Do we “have” to core them or can we just slice them? I am confused because of the pictures. Thanks

    1. Sorry for any confusion. When I use the term “core” for tomatoes, I mean to cut out a conical area from the top of the fruit where the stem is attached, not gut the entire tomato.

      1. Thank you for the quick response. I am new to all this and just wanted to make sure before I tried this recipe.. I can’t wait to try these as I have TON of green tomatoes this season. You Rock!

  6. I would like to make this recipe, but I am confused regarding the amounts of ingredients listed for the 2x and 3x ingredients list. Why do the amounts for garlic cloves, dill, and bay leaves stay the same under 2x and 3x ingredient lists? Shouldn’t they be increased as well?

  7. When my husband was alive he never would boil the tomatoes in the jars. He would put into the fridge for a time and then he make a salad out of the green tomatoes. He would put green olives and peppers and other veggies.

  8. I canned 27 pints today . Can’t wait for a few weeks to try them . I eliminated the bay leaf . Added 1/2 of a Carolina reaper and 1/8 of a tsp of pickle crisp to each pint .

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recipe rating