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Pumpkin Waffles with Maple Cinnamon Whipped Cream

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In honor of “pumpkin spice everything” season, I wanted to share this recipe for pumpkin waffles with maple cinnamon whipped cream.

pumpkin waffle with maple cinnamon whipped cream

Pumpkin spice waffles are perfect for a fall breakfast. If you don't have a waffle iron, you can use the recipe to make pumpkin pancakes.

We love real maple syrup on our waffles, but the maple cinnamon whipped cream is not to be missed. (You may be tempted to eat it straight with a spoon!)

Alternatively, some applesauce or brandied cinnamon apple preserves would also be lovely. Use peanut butter or nut butter topping for extra protein.

Tips for Pumpkin Waffle Success

I highly recommend oiling your waffle iron (even a non-stick one) with butter or coconut oil to help prevent sticking. The extra sugar and moisture from the pumpkin makes these waffles a bit prone to stay in the waffle iron. 

Do not overfill your iron, as the batter will fluff up a bit. My large round waffle maker takes just under a cup of batter for these, and I bake them for 4 minutes.

I have a Presto FlipSide Waffle Maker, which we've for several years. It's still in great shape, makes very nice waffles and is easy to clean. If you like homemade waffles, a flip waffle maker is worth the investment.

Serve these waffles fresh off the waffle iron for a light, crisp waffle. Because of the moisture of the squash, they will soften as they sit.

If you want a crispier waffle, reheat them in a toaster oven at 250F for five minutes.

The boys each polished off a waffle without batting an eyelash and said, “Thanks, Mom!”

pumpkin waffle with maple cinnamon whipped cream

Pumpkin Waffles Recipe

This pumpkin waffle recipe is adapted from the Wisconsin Pure Maple Syrup Cookbook by the Wisconsin Maple Syrup Producers Association.

Dry Ingredients:

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour or whole wheat pastry flour
  • 4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon each – ground ginger, nutmeg, allspice and cloves – or 1/2 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice blend
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Wet Ingredients:

  • 3 eggs
  • 1 cup milk
  • 4 tablespoons melted butter
  • 1 cup cooked squash or pumpkin puree

Directions:

Preheat and oil waffle iron.

Combine dry ingredients in a large bowl. In a medium sized bowl, whisk together wet ingredients. Pour wet ingredients into dry and whisk until just blended.

Ladle or scoop batter into waffle iron and cook until crisp.

Serve immediately with maple cinnamon whipped cream or your choice of toppings.

Makes around 5 large, round waffles.

Which Pumpkin to Use

You can use commercial canned pumpkin puree or home cooked pumpkin.

Many squash varieties produce darker, drier, sweeter flesh than pumpkins, so I prefer them for cooking. (To me, you get more “pumpkin flavor” with squash than with pumpkins.)

To prepare pumpkin/squash puree, cut the fruit in half and scoop out seeds. Place the fruit cut side down in a large pan with about an inch of water.

Bake at 350°F until a fork easily penetrates the flesh of the pumpkin, about 1 hour for a medium squash.

Scoop soft flesh out of pumpkin shell and use within 2-3 days or freeze for longer storage. Use a blender or food processor to make a smooth puree.

For more detailed pumpkin puree instructions see, “How to Cook a Pumpkin or Winter Squash – 3 Easy Methods“.

homemade pumpkin puree from cooked pumpkin

Maple Cinnamon Whipped Cream

Adapted from about.com

Ingredients

  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 1 tablespoon powdered sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Directions

With a stand mixer or whisk, beat cream until soft peaks begin to form. Add syrup, sugar, vanilla and cinnamon.

Continue beating/whisking until stiff peaks form. Use immediately or refrigerate and use within 24 hours for best quality.

This is how my youngest son likes to eat his waffles. First, apply a dab of butter in each waffle divot. Then apply a drizzle of real maple syrup over the entire waffle.

(See “How to Make Maple Syrup” if you're interested in making this natural sweetener.)

boy eating a pumpkin waffle
My youngest, circa October 2012

Pair up with a large glass of milk, almond milk or apple cider and enjoy. It's a great way to get a little extra nutrition and flavor into a family favorite.

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pumpkin waffles

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Pumpkin Spice Waffles with Maple Cinnamon Whipped Cream

pumpkin waffle with maple cinnamon whipped cream

Pumpkin spice waffles pair up a favorite fall flavors and rich whipped cream for an easy but memorable breakfast treat.

  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 5 minutes
  • Total Time: 10 minutes
  • Yield: 5 waffles 1x
  • Category: Breakfast

Ingredients

Scale

Waffle Dry Ingredients

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour or whole wheat pastry flour
  • 4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon each – ground ginger, nutmeg, allspice and cloves  – or 1/2 teaspoon pumpkin spice blend
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Waffle wet ingredients

  • 3 eggs
  • 1 cup milk
  • 4 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 1 cup cooked squash or pumpkin puree

Maple Whipped cream ingredients

  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 1 tablespoon powdered sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Instructions

For the waffles

  1. Preheat and oil waffle iron.
  2. Combine dry ingredients in a large bowl. In a medium sized bowl, whisk together wet ingredients. Pour wet ingredients into dry and whisk until just blended. Ladle or scoop batter into waffle iron and cook until crisp. Serve immediately with maple cinnamon whipped cream or your choice of toppings.
  3. Makes around 5 large, round waffles.

For the whipped cream

  1. With a stand mixer or whisk, beat cream until soft peaks begin to form. Add syrup, sugar, vanilla and cinnamon. Continue beating/whisking until stiff peaks form. Use immediately or refrigerate and use within 24 hours for best quality.

Notes

You may use use commercial canned pumpkin puree or home cooked pumpkin. Many squash varieties produce darker, drier, sweeter flesh than pumpkins, so I prefer them for cooking.

To prepare pumpkin/squash puree, cut the fruit in half and scoop out seeds. Place the fruit cut side down in a large pan with about an inch of water.

Bake at 350°F until a fork easily penetrates the flesh of the pumpkin, about 1 hour for a medium squash.

Scoop soft flesh out of pumpkin shell. Puree and use within 2-3 days, or freeze for longer storage.

Keywords: pumpkin, squash, fall recipes, pumpkin spice

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PS – The Crazy Pumpkin and Squash Harvest

PS – This is the pumpkin and squash harvest that originally inspired this post.

Varieties include butternut, buttercup, Speckled Hound, Galeux D Eysines, Long Island Cheese, Marina di Chioggia, Lady Godiva, and spaghetti squash.

The great thing about pumpkins and squash is that with proper curing, many varieties will keep for months. This makes our stairs from the basement to the garage a perfect spot to stash a generous harvest.

See “When to Harvest Pumpkins (and the Best Ways to Store Them)” for more information.

Squash on steps
2012 Squash and Pumpkin Harvest on the basement stairs

Originally published October 2012 as “squaffles”, last updated in 2020.

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8 Comments

  1. Wow, that is a lot of squash! With all of the extra nutrition you can sneak into your baking this winter, your family should be strong and healthy for the winter.

      1. Lucky for you that there are lots of spaghetti squash. They last months! Your family should be able to enjoy plenty of warm squash recipes this winter. I recently tried something similar with shredded yellow squash. I added 2 cups of shredded squash to my sweet buttermilk cornbread batter. baked at 360 for 40 minutes to perfection. Warm wishes to you and your readers this Fall.

  2. LOVE that picture of all of your squashes… YUM! Squash is like my favorite thing. Unfortunately, a vine borer got mine this year, But next year I will be ready for those little suckers. 🙂
    So what kind of squash do you recommend for this recipe? I was thinking maybe butternut and I’ve made waffles with pumpkin before… but what else would work well?

    1. This time I made it with Galeux D Eysines, but any sweet squash or pumpkin would work. I’ve become more of a squash fan over the years, because (in general) their flesh tends to be sweeter, darker and denser.

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