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Potato Bread Made with Real Potatoes (Not Instant Potatoes)

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Most of the potato bread recipes I've seen used powdered mashed potatoes – not something I keep in my pantry. I love this potato bread recipe because it uses real mashed potatoes. It's also easy to make and stores well.

potato bread

When we were first married, my husband was a fan of store bought potato bread. (It resembles cotton candy in bread form, and I'm pretty sure they use potato flakes…)

I was tickled to find a bread recipe that uses real mashed potatoes. If I'm using leftover mashed potatoes, they go right into the bread with butter, milk, salt and pepper.

Some of my recommended bread making supplies and equipment:

Potato Bread Recipe Using Real Mashed Potatoes

The recipe I use is based on one from The Bread Machine Cookbook V.

This recipe produces a moist, dense loaf that is great for sandwiches and toast. It keeps on the counter for the better part of a week. For longer storage, it freezes very well, in case you want to make a double or triple batch.

Note: See bottom of post for print friendly version of recipe.

Ingredients

  • 7 ounces cooked potato (you can use leftover mashed potatoes, or cook up a small potato and mash it)
  • Warm water, enough to equal 1 3/4 cup when combined with the potato. (Put the mashed potato into a 2 cup measuring cup. Add water to bring the level up to 1 3/4 cup)
  • 2 tablespoons softened butter
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons sugar (or honey)
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 3 1/2 cups bread flour (I usually use a mix of fresh ground wheat flour and pre-milled flour)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons saf-instant yeast or bread machine yeast

How to Make Potato Bread

I normally mix the dough with a dough hook in my Bosch Universal Plus Kitchen Machine. After it rises, I form it into loaves, let rise, and bake in the oven.

(I finally bought a Bosch after killing three different bread machines. It's more expensive, but can handle double batches of whole wheat bread without a fuss, unlike lighter machines.)

potato bread ingredients

I add everything into the machine and mix for 6-8 minutes, adding additional flour if needed.

Add the last of flour slowly – you want your potato bread dough to be smooth and elastic. Too much flour will give you hard dough and dry bread.

bread dough after mixing

If kneading by hand, mix wet ingredients in a large bowl with yeast until thoroughly blended. Add dry ingredients, adjusting flour as needed to give a soft, elastic dough.

This dough will be a little bit more sticky than many bread doughs. This is normal. If you look closely, you can see little bits of brightly colored blue potato.

Let bread rest and rise for around 20 minutes, then punch down and allow to rise again. (This develops the flavor and gluten of the bread.)

dough after first rise

Forming the Loaves and Baking the Potato Bread

Once the dough doubles in size, form it into loaves and place in greased bread pans. A single recipe makes one large loaf (9×5) or two smaller loaves of potato bread.

If you make a double batch (shown here), divide it into three 9×5 loaf pans. I like to bake several loaves so I can keep the extras in the freezer to have on hand when needed.

rolling out bread

My favorite bread pans are the Pampered Chef Stoneware loaf pans. They are naturally somewhat non-stick, but not entirely. I do grease them a little, but bread tends to stick much more frequently in the glass pan than the stoneware.

Some other companies make less expensive stoneware loaf pans, but there are often strange design decisions, such as bulged sides. I like my Pampered Chef pans better.

loaves of potato bread before and after rising
Bread before and after rising

Preheat oven to 350F. Bake for 25 – 30 minutes, until golden brown. Remove from pans and cool on wire racks.

Try to wait for the bread to cool before cutting, if possible. When you cut open a steaming loaf of bread, steam escapes, leaving the remainder of the loaf dry. Of course, if it all disappears within a matter of minutes, this is a non-issue. 😉

I let this batch rise a bit too much, so the finished loaves (shown below) don't look picture perfect.

three loaves of potato bread

Remember, bread will rise a bit in the oven, so bake before it is overflowing the pans. (And don't get involved in another project and forget about your bread…)

Not every batch of bread may be “picture perfect”, but they all taste good!

The top and bottom photos in this post are from another batch of potato bread. Dunc and I braided some loaves for a different look. (Plain loaves are easier much easier!)

To Bake in a Bread Machine

If using a bread machine, select “wheat”, “sweet”, or “white bread” setting. Do not use a delayed bake timer.

Substituting Active Dry Yeast

To substitute active dry yeast for SAF-INSTANT yeast: Use 2 teaspoons active dry yeast. Proof in one cup of the warm water prior to mixing with the rest of the ingredients.

Potato Bread Dinner Rolls

If you'd like to bake your potato bread as potato rolls, that works great, too!

Simply portion the dough out and roll them to the size you prefer. Place on a greased or parchment lined baking sheet. Place them closer if you want soft sides, farther apart if you don't want the rolls to touch. Let rise until double in size.

Bake in a 375F oven for 12-15 minutes, until lightly browned. Remove from oven and cool on wire rack.

Need More Bread Recipes?

If you're looking for more than just potato bread, check out my book, Never Buy Bread Again: 20+ Homemade Bread Recipes!

Learn more and order your copy here.

In this book you’ll find:

  • Troubleshooting tips so you can bake without fear
  • Easy everyday breads such as sandwich bread and crusty French bread
  • Quick breads such as buttermilk biscuits, corn bread and pancakes
  • Gluten free breads
  • How to Make a Sourdough Starter and Basic Sourdough Bread
  • Holiday and special occasion breads, like fruit filled kolache, Polish doughnuts and pretzel bread
  • How to store and freeze breads (before and after baking) for best quality
  • Fun bread “go alongs” like flavored butters and cheese fondue
  • Recipes to make with leftover bread

The book includes full color photos, and stories from our family about the recipes and baking traditions. It has a spiral binding so that it lays flat on the kitchen counter for easy reading while cooking.

Print

Potato Bread Made with Mashed Potatoes

A tender bread made with real mashed potatoes. Great for sandwiches.

  • Prep Time: 1 hour
  • Cook Time: 25 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour 25 minutes
  • Yield: 2 loaves 1x
  • Category: Bread
  • Method: Baking

Ingredients

Scale
  • 7 ounces cooked potato
  • Warm water, enough to equal 1 3/4 cup when combined with the potato (Put the mashed potato into a 2 cup measuring cup. Add water to bring the level up to 1 3/4 cup)
  • 2 tablespoons softened butter
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons sugar (or honey)
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 3 1/2 cups bread flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons SAF-INSTANT yeast or bread machine yeast

Instructions

If mixing by machine:

  1. Add everything into the machine and mix for 6-8 minutes, adding additional flour if needed. Make sure add the last of flour slowly – you want the dough to be smooth and elastic. Too much flour will give you hard dough and dry bread.

If kneading by hand:

  1. Mix wet ingredients with yeast until thoroughly blended, then add dry ingredients, adjusting flour as needed to give a soft, elastic dough. This dough will be a little bit more sticky than many bread doughs. This is normal.

After mixing the dough:

  1. Let bread rest and rise for around 20 minutes, then punch down and allow to rise again.
  2. Once doubled in size, form dough into loaves and place in greased bread pans. A single recipe makes one large loaf or two smaller loaves. I usually divide the dough into two 9×5 pans, or make a double batch and divide it into three regular loaves.
  3. Preheat oven to 350F. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until golden brown. Remove from pans and cool on wire racks.
  4. Store in sealed container and use within a few days or freeze for longer storage.

Notes

You can use leftover mashed potatoes, or cook up a small potato and mash it.

If baking in a bread machine, select “wheat”, “sweet”, or “white bread” setting. Do not use a delay timer.

You may substitute 2 teaspoons active dry yeast (for SAF-INSTANT yeast) and proof in one cup of the warm water prior to mixing the dough.

Keywords: potato bread, yeast bread, white bread

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potato bread

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Originally posted in 2011, updated in 2019.

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43 Comments

  1. I am super happy to see this post. I used to adore potato bread. I love that you made it with whole wheat too! Can't wait to try this.

  2. Wow. This is a recipe I can hardly wait to try. My hubby loves mashed potatoes and potato bread. I love whole wheat so we can both be happy. Thanks.

  3. Brigid – I would have thought you'd have a potato doughnut recipe, or maybe you'd make up some potato cakes with extra BACON. 😉

    Mary – It's the best recipe I've found for this type of bread, so I hope it works out well for you, too.

    Heidi – sounds like a winner!

  4. This recipe sounds good, my hubby also is a fan of potato bread, I will have to give this a try. Thanks~April

  5. Ladies – if you try the recipe, please consider leaving me a note to let me know how it worked out for you, and if you'd suggest and "tweaks" to the recipe.

    1. Hello Laurie, I’m going to give this recipe a try today. However, I was just curious on why you don’t just let the bread cook in the bread machine vs cooking it in the oven? Will it come it any different or won’t cook right?

      1. I usually make a double batch at once now that I have the Bosch, so I can bake less frequently. Also, in the years that I used a bread machine, I was never as happy with the crust from a bread machine versus the crust when it’s oven baked. If you wanted to do a single batch on your standard baking cycle, it should work just fine.

  6. This looks really good! I just found your blog today. My husband grew up in Superior, so I know that neck of the woods. I love your thoughts. I grew up on a farm and had grandparents born around the same time as the depression too. Everything growing up was from scratch at their house, even after they moved to town. I miss those days, but try to keep the memories alive by doing as much as I can by scratch at home.

  7. I did my undergraduate studies at UW-Superior – that's where I met my husband. 🙂

    I've been cutting back on grains, but like you, I still keep family memories (and recipes) alive in the kitchen.

  8. I just added everything to the machine. BUt just realized that it is not clear if this is for two loaves or one. Please advise. I have a large bread machine and it should be fine, but am concerned that it may overflow?

  9. You should be fine, as most bread machine cookbooks I've seen specify 3-4 cups of flour. I just like to bake mine in two smaller loaves and then freeze one.

  10. Well, I got real excited when I saw the title til I got to the ingredients. I cannot do any type of wheat or gluten.Do you have any suggestions for substitutes to make this bread?

    1. Sherry – I haven’t tried this GF, but here’s a recipe for gf potato bread that doens’t have some of the weird ingredients of others – http://www.cookingbread.com/recipes/gluten_free_bread/gluten_free_potato_bread_recipe.html

      Potato Gluten Free Bread Recipe: Makes 1 loaf
      Ingredients

      1 large boiled potato
      2 eggs
      1 1/4 cups water
      1/4 cup melted butter
      1 teaspoon vinegar
      2 tablespoons sugar
      2 cups rice flour
      1/2 cup tapioca flour
      1 cup potato flour
      1 1/2 teaspoons salt
      2 teaspoons powdered gelatine
      1 tablespoon xanthum gum
      1 1/2 tablespoons active dry yeast

      Method

      Boil a potato till cooked. Drain and cool in cold water. Peel the potato and mash. You want to make sure there are no lumps in the potato. Whisk together the eggs and the water together and add to the breadmaker. Add in the melted butter, vinegar, sugar and mashed potato. In a bowl mix the flours, salt, gelatine and the xanthum gum together and stir. Add the flour mixture to the breadmaker. Sprinkle the yeast on top. Set the breadmaker to basic, 2 lb. After the bread is cooked allow to cool in the breadmaker for 10 minutes before removing. Cool on a rack.

  11. This is the best bread ever!!!!!!! I mixed the ingredients in my bread machine and put it on the dough cycle, then I took the dough out and let it rest for 20 minutes. Then I put the dough into 2 loaf pans and let rise until doubled and baked them in the oven. The bread was soft and it stayed soft. This is the only bread recipe that I will use. I did freeze one loaf and when I thawed it out it tasted like I just made it 🙂 YUM! YUM!

  12. nom! I do love a good potato gnocchi too. Have you ever made potato candy? It’s really nothing more than potatoes, peanut butter, and sugar, so you know… super healthy… but it’s an option for your leftover spuds too.

  13. Thanks for this! I accidentally let a bunch of raw potatoes freeze and am hoping I can save them from the trash by turning them into bread. I’ve got three loaves of this in my oven right now and it smells wonderful!

  14. I made this using almost a cup of potatoes and then adding milk to make 1 1/4 cup. Then I added the water to make it to 1 3/4 cup. The rest I left the same and put it all in the bread machine. It was awesome and I made another loaf right away because I couldn’t stop eating it!

  15. Oh my goodness.. this is so good.. wow!! It’s a winner here 🙂 I’m wanting to look at the all potato bread too, as I’m trying to get farther away from so many grains, but wow.. I did do some tweaking though 🙂 Here’s what I did.. I didn’t use butter, but coconut oil, so no dairy here. Then I used one cup (out of the 3 1/2) of ground millet. The rest I used organic wheat. And because I used to make bread all the time.. but have gotten out of the habit of it, I thought about making one of our favorites.. herb. So, I added some black pepper, oregano, thyme, and a little caraway seed too. To add a little bit of a nutty flavor and just to see how it would taste (I like to play in the kitchen) I used some nutritional yeast also.. everything else you had on the list, I did the same. I used my hand mixer with dough hooks, which went really fast.. (awesome.. really) and then did the one rise, punch down and put it in one large pan because.. I had a feeling it would not last long haha.. The bread rose wonderfully and smells and tastes fantastic. 🙂 I have another idea I’m going to try, I’ll let you know when I do. I’m going to try sweet potato (the white flesh kind which is sweeter) and swirl some cinnamon in it and add about 1/2 cup of raisins. Not sure yet, but thinking about adding a few nuts too. I’m hoping it comes out as a sweet bread with that wonderful cinnamon too.. we eat a lot of sweet potatoes, so that would be easy. Thank you!!! 🙂

  16. Hi, I want to try this potato bread. It has been YEARS since I made bread. We do not eat a lot of store bought bread (I have Crohn’s so I try to avoid it…But I love warm bread with butter and I miss it). My question is: do you let the dough rise twice. Once after punching down and then again when it is shaped and put in the loaf pans?? I wasn’t quite clear on that part. Thank You for sharing

  17. Made this tonight with leftover mashed potatoes from Christmas. It was absolutely delicious. I didn’t change anything. Mixed in breadmaker, then baked in oven.

  18. Thank you for sharing such a great recipe! Made it yesterday and everybody in my family loved it.
    I did not have leftover mashed potato so instead I baked 2 small potatoes in the microwave and mashed them. When recipe calls to add water to 1 3/4 cup I mixed it with milk to bring it closer to the taste of mashed potatoes. Put everything in the bread machine, baked on Sweet option with Medium crust and we got a delicious loaf of perfect potato bread.

  19. I had to add a 1/2c warm milk to the recipe because I live in a dry climate and the dough was way too dry. It worked. But I am baking it in the oven but NO temp for the oven and NO time to bake. I like that you use real mashed potatoes and not instant flakes

    1. Yes, sometimes recipes need to be adjusted based on local conditions. I hope it works well for you. BTW, the URL entry to leave a comment is for those who have websites and want to leave a link to them.

  20. Hi Laurie, Thanks for this recipe! I was looking for a bread that used up mashed potatoes, and here it is. One question — I’ve just made my dough and let it sit for 20 minutes, and I’m not seeing any rise at all. My kitchen isn’t particularly cold. Should I have warmed my water and/or proofed the yeast first? And if the answer is “yes,” is there any way to salvage it now?

    Thanks!

    1. If you used instant yeast, proofing isn’t necessary. I do try to use warm ingredients to encourage rising. (I will add that to the post. I always warm my liquids for bread baking, so I didn’t think to mention it.) The yeast should kick in if you put it in a warmer area. You could set your bread bowl in a sink of warm water, or turn your stove on love and set the bread bowl somewhere on or near it.

  21. I live alone and bake my own bread. This recipe is wonderful! I have made it 3 or 4 times now. I have a question. Can I make this single recipe and make 3 small loaves out of it? And what would the cooking time be reduced to? 3 loaves will let me freeze 2 loaves and keep one for right away. I don’t eat the two loaves fast enough and I thought to break it down to 3 might cut down on waste. Thanks for a great recipe!

    1. There’s no reason you can’t divide the dough any way you like, even making buns out of it. I haven’t made loaves that small, but I think around 15-20 minutes of bake time should do the trick.

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